A L E X G A W R O N S K I

Advanced Visual Studies

Advanced Visual Studies, 2017

Alex Gawronski, Advanced Visual Studies 1

Alex Gawronski, Advanced Visual Studies 1a

Alex Gawronski, Advanced Visual Studies 2a

Alex Gawronski, Advanced Visual Studies 2

Alex Gawronski, Advanced Visual Studies 3a

Alex Gawronski, Advanced Visual Studies 3

Alex Gawronski, Advanced Visual Studies 5a

Alex Gawronski, Advanced Visual Studies 5

 

Alex Gawronski: Advanced Visual Studies, 2017

(Timber, mdf, two-way mirror perspex, halogen lights, computer programmed algorithmic switching mechanism)

KNULP, NSW, Sydney

The existing gallery partition was completed by closing-off access to the gallery office area. A two-way mirror was inserted centrally into the completed wall. Physical access to the area of the gallery reserved for its directors and ‘staff’, representing its behind-the-scenes operational functions, was now completely blocked. Lights installed in the office area of the gallery were randomly programmed to turn on and off. When ‘on’, the detritus behind the wall – including documents, stored artworks and other miscellany – were suddenly revealed. When the light was ‘off’, audiences were simply confronted with their own reflections. This cycle of random illumination continued 24 hours a day whether the gallery was technically open or closed. The effect was as if the gallery had been possessed, that it was an entity operating regardless of the presence of visitors and had assumed an autonomous life of its own. The two-way mirror window, common to institutions like hospitals, police stations, and interrogation facilities, spoke also of the traditional separation between audience and director or curator, both observers, both judges.

 

 

Written by alex gawronski

March 9, 2018 at 9:23 PM